Quadrant Graph

What is a quadrant graph? Simply, it’s a scatterplot with a two by two grid overlayed on top. The grid makes it easier to walk your reader through the data by turning a larger group of data points into 4 talking points.

This page was created as an example for the ReportPress gallery. That said, it is built from real data shared by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics and the Cook Political Report.

For Context

One republican talking point is that firearm violence is a city problem. They often call out blue state cities like New York and Chicago as being the biggest contributors to firearm violence. But what does the data show?

In October, Florida’s Republican governor Ron DeSantis proclaimed crime in New York City was “out of control” and blamed it on George Soros. Another Sunshine State politico, former president Donald Trump, offered his native city up as a Democrat-run dystopia, one of those places “where the middle class used to flock to live the American dream are now war zones, literal war zones.” – Politico – The Surprising Geography of Gun Violence

Now let’s break down the quadrant graph.

Where the popular vote went to Biden.

On the right side of the graph (highlighted here in blue) you will see all the states where Biden won the popular vote in the 2020 Election.

Where the popular vote went to Trump.

On the left side of the graph (highlighted here in red) you will see all the states where Trump won the popular vote in the 2020 Election.

The average number of state firearm deaths was 16.36 per 100,000 total population. This is the dividing line between the top and bottom of the graph.

The states that had fewer than average firearm deaths.

On the bottom half of the graph you will see all the states where per capita firearm deaths in 2021 were fewer than the average.

This includes the majority of blue states with only a few exceptions (Delaware, Colorado, and, the greatest outlier, New Mexico). New York state actually has the fourth lowest firearm death rate in the nation.

Most of the purple states, but only a few of the red states, had less than average per capita firearm deaths.

The states that had higher than average firearm deaths.

On the top half of the graph you will see all the states where per capita firearm deaths in 2021 were higher than the average.

This include 16 out of the 20 highest percentage Trump voting red states.

The bottom line.

Contrary to the rhetoric, residing in a red state likely puts you at a much higher risk for dying from a firearm. Given that many of these states also have the weakest gun safety laws, this should not be a surprise.

Data Sources

CDC – National Center for Health Statistics

The Cook Political Report

Would you like an interactive report like the one you see here?

ReportPress Full Service is an all-in-one WordPress development and data visualization design service for cutting edge interactive reports and data dashboards.

Schedule your free consultation with Chris today!